Do we trust mCommerce?

prelin —  February 7, 2013 — Leave a comment

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As mCommerce and mobile payments continue to grow so to do people’s trust in the mediums according to a new report by mobile company, Buzzcity:

BuzzCity Dr CEO KF Lai reckons that education has played a massive role in getting people to trust mcommerce: “It is clear that consumers are now far more receptive to mobile commerce than ever before; this comes as a result of continuous education by the mobile industry to overcome concerns such as trust and security, combined with falling data costs and increased capabilities of smartphones and tablets.”

The unstoppable proliferation of mobile devices, along with the convenience they provide, has put online stores and the ability to compare and research purchases directly into the hands of consumers.

According to BuzzCity most people use their phones to “browse and buy” — search engines and social media are a major source of information, along with 14% using review and comparison sites, and 17% relying on friends’ recommendations. However, mobile ads still influence a lot of purchases. Around 17% of the people surveyed claimed they’d been persuaded to buy via an advert.

This increased consumer confidence has had on mcommerce, has seen a shift in what people are buying. They’re not only purchasing digital products for their phones in the form of entertainment content (video, games, music) but also physical products (clothes and electronics).

“Mobile is now the first screen for many. Our research shows that there are many influences involved in consumers’ decisions when shopping via a mobile device. Marketers must ensure that they put strategy before tactics and take into consideration user behaviour as well as multi-screen viewing. Any brand embarking on global campaigns should bear in mind that consumer reliance on these services can differ greatly by region, and merchants need to understand these cultural nuances by localising content strategies and apportioning resources accordingly,” says Lai.

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